Freedom Bridge

 Posted by (Visited 11670 times)  Game talk  Tagged with: ,
Jun 162010
 

Freedom Bridge, by Necessary Games. It’s a small “notgame” (read: art game) about Freedom Bridge, in Korea.

  9 Responses to “Freedom Bridge”

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Raph Koster, Reid Bryant Kimball. Reid Bryant Kimball said: Brilliant awareness raising game. RT @raphkoster: New blog post: Freedom Bridge https://www.raphkoster.com/2010/06/16/freedom-bridge/ […]

  2. I often take issue with games this short and message-centric, but it was very effective.

  3. … … Why does moving a little black square over some poorly drawn barbed wire feel infinitely more painful than anything in some big dramatic game striving for emotional connection? What are they missing that this so perfectly captures?

    And here, despite being the barest representation possible, is something far more deeply affecting than the biggest budget “emotional experience” being crafted today.

  4. @Eolirin,

    For a parallel reason to why black and white photographs are felt to convey more emotion.

  5. Yep very effective. Kind of want to go curl into a ball now though.

  6. In true gamer style, I kept hitting my arrow keys, waiting for my four-sided avatar to respawn… but alas… no happy ending.

  7. And here, despite being the barest representation possible, is something far more deeply affecting than the biggest budget “emotional experience” being crafted today.

    you’re right. it’s better than heavy rain.

    by the way, how’s your farmville clone?

  8. Quite impressive. I appreciate the additional time provided at the end of the experience for reflection. The time forces you to reflect on what your “choices” have meant, which I think more games that offer meaning could benefit from. I find that many games reset or move on to the next level before I have a chance to fully grok the meaning behind what I just experienced.

    Thanks for the link Raph.

  9. @shi Heavy Rain comes close, but hobbles itself with craft failures. It’s still excellent, and unmatched in it’s field for anything with a budget, but it’s got too many rough edges. Some of the strongest emotional peaks in Heavy Rain are the slow moments and almost all toward the very beginning; sitting in silence with nothing to do after Sean comes back to school is probably the single most affecting part of the entire game, especially from a mechanical point of view. But it never quite manages to inspire with the same level of clarity. There’s almost always *something* that pulls away from the feeling. It’s a richer, deeper, experience, but it fails to be as powerful.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.